‘ Happy Independence Day to All My American Readers and Followers this is Just for You ‘


#AceHistoryNews – UNITED STATES – July 04 – Variously known as the Fourth of July and Independence Day, July 4th has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution (1775-83).

​In June 1776, representatives of the 13 colonies then fighting in the revolutionary struggle weighed a resolution that would declare their independence from Great Britain. On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favour of independence, and two days later its delegates adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson.

​From 1776 until the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with typical festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues.

​THE BIRTH OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE

When the initial battles in the Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775, few colonists desired complete independence from Great Britain, and those who did were considered radical. By the middle of the following year, however, many more colonists had come to favour independence, thanks to growing hostility against Britain and the spread of revolutionary sentiments such as those expressed in Thomas Paine’s best-selling pamphlet “Common Sense,” published in early 1776.


​On June 7, when the Continental Congress met at the PennsylvaniaState House (later Independence Hall) in Philadelphia, the Virginia delegate Richard Henry Lee introduced a motion calling for the colonies’ independence. Amid heated debate, Congress postponed the vote on Lee’s resolution, but appointed a five-man committee–including Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, John Adams of Massachusetts, Roger Sherman of Connecticut, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania and Robert R. Livingston of New York–to draft a formal statement justifying the break with Great Britain.


John Adams believed that July 2nd was the correct date on which to celebrate the birth of American independence, and would reportedly turn down invitations to appear at July 4th events in protest. Adams and Thomas Jefferson both died on July 4, 1826–the 50th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence.

On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favour of Lee’s resolution for independence in a near-unanimous vote (the New York delegation abstained, but later voted affirmatively). On that day, John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail that July 2 “will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival” and that the celebration should include “Pomp and Parade…Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other.”

On July 4th, the Congress formally adopted the Declaration of Independence, which had been written largely by Jefferson.

Though the vote for actual independence took place on July 2nd, from then on the 4th became the day that was celebrated as the birth of American independence.

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#NHS : ” Tales of Neglect Increase Under this Conservative Government”


Ann Clwyd (Labour, Cynon Valley MP), photo by ...

Ann Clwyd (Labour, Cynon Valley MP), photo by Aberdare Blog. Photo taken at a ceremony to unveil the Keir Hardie bust, at Rock Grounds, Aberdare, December 2006. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

#AceHealthNews says `Tales of Neglect on the NHS now amount to  3,000 as `MP Exposes Shocking Care of the Elderly’ `

  • Ann Clwyd was put in charge of investigation into NHS complaints after exposing the shocking care her husband received
  • Said she was inundated with patients‘ letters about a ‘lack of compassion’

Elderly patients are still routinely being neglected and abused by NHS nurses, an MP has warned.

Ann Clwyd, who was put in charge of an investigation into NHS complaints after exposing the shocking care her husband received, said she was inundated with patients’ letters about a ‘lack of compassion’ – 3,000 in the past year alone.

Nurses were telling elderly patients they ‘do not have time’ to administer pain relief, and making them and their families feel like intruders, she said.

The MP also told how families contacting her claimed patients were routinely left to starve on NHS wards ‘because food was taken away’. The weight of one woman in her 90s dropped to just five stone.

Another woman, aged 88, was left in a chair in A&E for seven hours ‘in agony’ and expected ‘not to make any demands’, she said.

Mrs Clwyd, the Labour MP for Cynon Valley, South Wales, broke down in the Commons in December 2012 when she described how her husband Owen had died in hospital ‘like a battery hen’.
Read more: DM

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#Russia : ” Polar Expedition Headed by `Faddey Bellingshausen’ Discovered Antarctica”


#AceNewsGroup:

#AHN2014

Originally posted on Ace History 2 Research News :

#History2Research says on January 28, 1820, a Russian polar expedition, headed by Faddey Bellingshausen, discovered Antarctica.

Russian HistoryThe supposition of Antarctica’s existence appeared in the 16th Century, and for years people tried to confirm it. In 1772-1775, James Cook, the English sailor, sailed across the Southern Ocean and did not find any signs of the “The Unknown Southern Land”, so the world lost interest in the South Pole for some time.

At the beginning of 1819, on the recommendation of three famous sailors – Admiral Gavril Sarychev, captain-commander Ivan Kruzenstern and captain-lieutenant Otto Kotzebue, – the Russian government decided to conduct a polar expedition for “acquiring knowledge about our Earth” and “discovering new lands near the South Pole.” Krusenstern wrote in his letter to the Admiralty that Russia should not share the glory of the possible discoveries with any other country.

On July 16, 1819, two Russian sloops…

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US: “George Stinney the `Boy of 14 Executed 70 Years Ago’ May Get Another Day in Court”


#AceNewsServices says some of you may remember this case which l highlighted on “AceHistoryNews”  on the “Miranda Rights” and the fact he was not protected.

George Stinney, 1944, executed at age 14 years old

George Stinney, 1944, executed at age 14 years old (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Extract of Original Post: 

“In a South Carolina prison on June 16, 1944, guards walked a 14-year-old Black boy, bible tucked under his arm, to theelectric chair. He used the bible as a booster seat. At 5′ 1″ and 95 pounds, the straps didn’t fit, and an electrode was too big for his leg. The switch was pulled, and the adult sized death mask fell from his face. Tears streamed from his wide-open, tearful eyes, and saliva dripped from his mouth. Witnesses recoiled in horror as they watched the execution of the youngest person in the United States in the past century.

George Stinney was accused of killing two White girls, 11-year-old Betty June Binnicker and 8-year-old Mary Emma Thames. Because there were no Miranda rights in 1944, Stinney was questioned without a lawyer and his parents were not allowed into the room. The sheriff when said that Stinney admitted to the killings, but there is only his word — no written record of the confession has been found. Reports even said that the officers offered Stinney ice cream for confessing to the crimes.

'Old Sparky' is the electric chair that Nebras...

‘Old Sparky’ is the electric chair that Nebraska used for executions. It is housed in the Nebraska State Penitentiary in Lincoln, Nebraska (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Latest Good News: 

(COLUMBIA, S.C.) — A 14-year-old boy executed by South Carolina nearly 70 years ago is finally getting another day in court.

Supporters of George Stinney plan to argue Tuesday that there wasn’t enough evidence to find him guilty in 1944 of killing a 7-year-old and an 11-year-old girl. The black teen was found guilty of killing the white girls in a trial that lasted less than a day in the tiny Southern mill town of Alcolu, separated, as most were in those days, by race.

Nearly all the evidence, including a confession that was central to the case against Stinney, has disappeared, along with the transcript of the trial. Lawyers working on behalf of Stinney’s family have sworn statements from his relatives accounting for his time the day the girls were killed, from a cell-mate saying he never confessed to the crime and from a pathologist disputing the findings of the autopsy done on the victims.

The novel decision whether to give an executed man a new trial will be in the hands of Circuit Judge Carmen Mullen. Experts say it is a longshot. South Carolina law has a high bar for new trials based on evidence that could have been discovered at the time of the trial. Also, the legal system in the state before segregation often found defendants guilty with evidence that would be considered scant today. If Mullen finds in favor of Stinney, it could open the door for hundreds of other appeals.

But the Stinney case is unique in one way. At 14, he’s the youngest person executed in the United States in the past 100 years. Even in 1944, there was an outcry over putting someone so young in the electric chair. Newspaper accounts said the straps in the chair didn’t fit around his 95-pound body and an electrode was too big for his leg.

Stinney’s supporters said racism, common in the Jim Crow era South, meant deputies in Clarendon County did little investigation after they decided Stinney was the prime suspect. They said he was pulled from his parents and interrogated without a lawyer.

School board member George Frierson heard stories about Stinney growing up in the same mill town and has spent a decade fighting to get him exonerated. He swallowed hard as he said he hardly slept before the day he has waited 10 years to see.

“Somebody that didn’t kill someone is finally getting his day in court,” Frierson said.

Back in 1944, Stinney was likely the only black person in the courtroom during his one-day trial. On Tuesday, the prosecutor arguing against him will be Ernest “Chip” Finney III, the son of South Carolina’s first black Chief Justice. Finney said last month he won’t preset any evidence against Stinney at the hearing, but if a new trial is granted, he will ask for time to conduct a new investigation.

What that investigation might find is not known. South Carolina did not have a statewide law enforcement unit to help smaller jurisdictions until 1947. Newspaper stories about Stinney’s trial offer little clue whether any evidence was introduced beyond the teen’s confession and an autopsy report. Some people around Alcolu said bloody clothes were taken from Stinney’s home, but never introduced at trial because of his confession. No record of those clothes exists.

Relatives of one of the girls killed, 11-year-old Betty Binnicker, have recently spoke out as well, saying Stinney was known around town as a bully who threatened to fight or kill people who came too close to the grass where he grazed the family cow.

It isn’t known if the judge will rule Tuesday, or take time to come to her decision. Stinney’s supporters said if the motion for a new trial fails, they will ask the state to pardon him.

 

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” The Darker Side of Chocolate Unmasking the Slave Trade”


#AceNewsGroup:

#AceHistoryNews says this true life story of how our “Chocolate” is made using “Slave Labour” #profitb4people
Editor says visit this link http://wp.me/p48Dp0-8a to learn a lot more?

Originally posted on Ace History 2 Research News :

#AceHistoryNews says The Dark Side of Chocolate is a 2010 documentary film about the exploitation and slave trading of African children to harvest chocolate still occurring nearly ten years after the cocoa industry pledged to end it.

Dark Side of ChocolateThe Dark Side of Chocolate was produced by Danish journalist Miki Mistrati who investigated child labor and trafficked children in chocolate production. It is filmed by U. Roberto Romano.

Dark Side of Chocolate DocumentaryThe filming started inGermany, where Mistrati asked vendors where their chocolate comes from. They then flew to Mali, where many of the children are from. Next, they explored the Ivory Coast where the cocoa plantations are located. The film ends in Switzerland where both the International Labor Organization (ILO) and the Nestle headquarters are located.

Much of the footage in this documentary is recorded using a secret camera located in a bag Mistrati carried with him.

The documentary was released…

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“Lindisfarne Gospels”


Originally posted on Ace British History News :

#AceHistoryNews says the story of the “Lindisfarne Gospels” are part of our very fabric of Britain, this is how they came into being.    

LGStLukecarpetpg.jpg

The Lindisfarne Gospels, British Library

An Eight Century monk’s artistic legacy is one of Britain’s greatest literary and religious treasures.

The Lindisfarne Gospels were produced more than 1300 years ago at the monastery of Lindisfarne on the Northumbrian coast. The single volume manuscript consists of 500 pages of beautiful calligraphy and decorative symbols. An Anglo-Saxon translation of the Latin text was added two centuries later and is the earliest known English version of the gospels. The book survived the centuries in spectacular condition and is now held by the British Library.

Dr Michelle Brown, curator of illuminated manuscripts for the British Library, has researched the origins and craftsmanship of the work. Her findings are shared at an exhibition called Painted Labyrinth – the World…

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